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How to take care of your teeth when you have braces

How to take care of your teeth when you have braces

Braces are a wonderful way to straighten your teeth and improve your smile. However, taking care of your teeth can be a little more complicated when you have braces on. For example, food can easily become trapped in your braces, and this food can become plaque, which in turn can cause cavities. Because of this, it’s important to take extra care of your teeth if you have braces. This includes brushing your teeth with extra care.

In this post, we’ll talk more about how to look after your teeth if you have braces. We’ll be discussing four aspects of oral hygiene care as they relate to braces: brushing, flossing, dental visits and your diet. So let’s go!

Brushing

If you have braces, then it’s important to brush your teeth thoroughly. Brushing removes any food or plaque that is left stuck between your braces and your teeth. So make sure to clean in all the nooks and crannies of your braces – and don’t miss anything because bits of leftover food can lead to plaque.

What kind of toothbrush do you need if you have braces? In general, you want a toothbrush with a small head so you can get into all those hard-to-reach places. Some companies sell special toothbrushes and toothbrush heads designed for people with braces. For example, Oral-B sells an electric toothbrush head called the Ortho Brush Head which is specially designed to remove plaque from around brackets.

Flossing

Flossing is more difficult with braces because the braces get in the way. In fact, it’s almost impossible to floss the gum-line, for example, because the floss simply can’t past the braces.

But don’t despair, because they are special floss products designed for people with braces. One example is the floss threader. This is basically a disposable loop which helps you to floss your gum line. If you’re interested in how a floss threader works, we recommend watching this short but informative YouTube video.

Dental visits

As your braces treatment progresses, you’ll need to see your orthodontist regularly so that he or she can adjust the braces. Don’t be afraid to ask any questions or voice any concerns during these visits, especially if you’ve had any problems or difficulties with your braces.

Your routine dental check-ups are also still important when you have braces. In fact, they’re more important than ever, since your risk of cavities and gum disease are higher when you have braces on. So make sure you still visit your general dentist every six months for a check-up.

Diet

Your diet has a major effect on the health of your teeth: if you eat lots of sugar and sugary foods, then you’re more likely to suffer from plaque and cavities. This is especially important to know if you have braces because food is more likely to get stuck to your teeth and cause plaque.

A good way to protect your teeth when you have braces is to limit the amount of sugar you eat. Avoid sugary foods as much as possible, limiting them to mealtimes if you have to eat them at all.

Conclusion

Hopefully, you’ve now more confident about taking care of your teeth with braces. Remember: brush well, be careful with what you eat, and see your dentist regularly.

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How to keep your child’s teeth healthy

How to keep your child’s teeth healthy

There’s nothing worse than seeing a child in pain, which is why it’s important to keep your child’s teeth strong and healthy. That’s because if you don’t take care of your child’s teeth, cavities can form, which can become quite painful and even eventually cause tooth loss. To make sure your child has healthy, cavity-free teeth, follow the advice in this post.

Make sure your child brushes their teeth twice a day

Dentists recommend that adults brush their teeth twice a day – the same goes for babies and children too. In fact, you should start brushing a baby’s teeth as soon as the first tooth appears, which is usually between four and seven months.

For babies and children, it’s best to use a toothpaste that’s relatively low in fluoride – around 1,000ppm will do the trick. Adults are better off using a toothpate with around 1250ppm of fluoride, which is a bit stronger. Children need a weaker toothpast because they’re more likely to swallow the toothpaste than adults, and swallowed toothpast can cause a condition known as fluorosis if it’s ingested often enough. That’s why you should only use a tiny smear of toothpaste for babies and a pea-sized blob for children.

If you find that your child refuses to brush his teeth, then there’s a few things you can do to overcome the problem. First, let your child choose his own toothbrush – the ones with cartoon designs on them are often popular with children. Second, try using a flavoured child’s toothpaste as they can be more agreeable to a child’s palate. Third, make sure your child sees you brushing your own teeth, as there’s nothing a child likes more than copying Mum and Dad.

Take your child for regular dental checkups

It’s said that adults should see a dentist at least once a year. Children should see a dentist even more frequently – around every six months or so. This is because children tend to eat a lot of sugar in their diet and this can quickly lead to cavities. Dental checkups are important because a dentist can give a filling if the cavity has become too large, thus preventing further damage to your child’s teeth.

Many children are apprehensive about going to the dentist. If your child feels this way, then don’t worry; it’s entirely normal. You can help your child to overcome this fear by teaching her about what happens at dental checkups and by letting your child watch you yourself go through your own checkup, if possible.

Limit your child’s sugar intake

As mentioned, children tend to eat a lot of sugar. Sugar is found everywhere nowadays and it’s especially prevalent in kids’ diets – sweets, chocolate, biscuits, breakfast cereal, whole fruit, dried fruit and fruit juice are just some common sources of sugar. Try to limit your child’s sugar intake as much as possible because it wreaks havoc on children’s teeth. Sugar is the main cause of cavities in the UK, not only among children but with adults as well. Children should be eating no more than 25 g of sugar (that’s six teaspoons) per day.

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How to use an electric toothbrush properly

How to use an electric toothbrush properly

An electric toothbrush can be a great replacement for a manual toothbrush. To get the most out of an electric toothbrush, however, it’s important to understand how to use one properly. In this blog post, we’ll go over the steps to brushing with an electric toothbrush, and we’ll also answer some of your other questions about this type of brush.

How long should I brush with an electric toothbrush?

Some people think that just because they have an electric toothbrush, they can brush for just one minute or less. The truth is that you need to brush for at least two minutes – and that’s whether you’re using an electric brush or not. In fact, you might need to brush for even longer if you’re using an electric toothbrush than if you were using a manual toothbrush. Sounds counter-intuitive but it’s true! What’s also true is that if you brush for less than two minutes then it means you’re not cleaning your teeth effectively. So make sure to brush your teeth for at least two minutes – and even longer if your teeth need it.

Fortunately, most electric toothbrushes nowadays come with a timer that lets you know how long you’ve been brushing for. This is one reason why dentists often recommend electric toothbrushes over their manual counterparts because with a timer, you can be certain that you’ve brushed to exactly two minutes.

How do I brush with an electric toothbrush?

To clean your teeth with an electric toothbrush, simply follow these steps:

  1. First, place the bristles of the toothbrush against your teeth and then turn on the toothbrush.
  2. Make small, slow circles against the external surface of the tooth. Try to get under the gums and between your teeth, as these areas are often where plaque and bacteria build up.
  3. After a couple of seconds, move on to the next tooth, and then the next, until you’ve cleaned the external surface of all your teeth.
  4. At this point, you should still have a minute left to clean the inside surfaces of your teeth. The method here is the same as before – simply place the bristles of the brush against your teeth and make small, circular movements. You should clean each tooth for around two seconds before moving on to the next one.

Should I brush my tongue with an electric toothbrush?

The answer is yes, you should. This is because your tongue is an area where bacteria can accumulate.

To clean your tongue with an electric toothbrush, simply place the toothbrush head against your tongue, turn the toothbrush on and then gently scrub your tongue clean.

How often should I change my toothbrush head?

It’s best to change your toothbrush head every three months or so. Also, you should change the head even sooner if you see that the bristles are becoming worn and splayed. By making sure that the toothbrush head you use is in good condition, it will make brushing your teeth more effectively.

If you’d like to speak to one of our dentists about electric toothbrushes or any other dental topic, simply make an appointment with by our friendly reception staff!

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All you need to know about cavities

All you need to know about cavities

Cavities are a problem that affect the enamel, which is the hard, outer layer of your teeth. Along with gum disease, it’s one of the most common dental problems, especially among older patients.

How do dental cavities occur?

Your teeth are covered with an invisible layer of plaque, which is made up of bacteria and tiny bits of food from the meals you’ve eaten. This plaque forms just twenty minutes after you’ve eaten.

If you don’t clean off the plaque by brushing and flossing, then the bacteria that make up the plaque will take the sugar and starch from the foods you’ve eaten and convert it into acid. This acid will attack your enamel by demineralising your teeth, and eventually, you’ll get cavities.

What are the main risk factors for cavities?

The main risk factors for cavities are:

  • Poor oral hygiene. Brushing your teeth the wrong way, not brushing your teeth for long enough and forgetting to use floss can all lead to cavities.
  • Crooked teeth. If your teeth are crooked or are too close together, this can be a risk factor for cavities because it makes it harder for you to clean between your teeth.
  • Diet. A diet high in sugar, starch and acidic foods can easily lead to cavities.
  • Acidic saliva. Some people naturally have slightly acidic saliva, and unfortunately this puts them at greater risk of cavities.
  • Vomiting. Vomiting and gastrointestinal reflux can lead to cavities because the acid weakens your teeth.

What are the symptoms of cavities?

Initially, cavities are symptomless, but as they get larger your teeth will become more sensitive to certain foods, such as hot and cold foods as well as sweet ones.

Other early signs of cavities are stains, bad breath and a bad taste in the mouth.

Once the cavity has grown large enough to get through the enamel, you’ll probably feel pain as the cavity makes it way to the tooth’s pulp and nerve. You also might experience inflammation.

If you think you have a cavity, then it’s best to see a dentist as soon as possible. A dentist will be able to tell if you have a cavity or nor and will be able to administer treatment if necessary.

How can I prevent cavities?

Avoid cavities isn’t complicated. There are two main things you have to do: maintain a healthy diet and stick to a good oral hygiene routine. Here’s a few more tips on how to keep your teeth cavity-free:

  1. Brush your teeth twice day. Brush your teeth for two minutes twice a day, change your toothbrush every three months and make sure to use a toothpaste that contains fluoride.
  2. Floss. Make sure to floss every day before you go to sleep. It will help to dislodge food and bacteria from between your teeth.
  3. Chew gum. Chewing gum can help to prevent cavities because it stimulates your mouth to produce saliva. If you do chew gum though, make sure it’s sugar-free!
  4. Eat a healthy diet. Limit the amount of sugary and acidic foods that you eat, such as fruit juices.
  5. Visit a dentist regularly. Visit a dentist twice a year for a checkup.

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The link between sugar and tooth decay

The link between sugar and tooth decay

Thousands of bacteria live in your mouth. Most of them are harmless, but unfortunately, some are harmful and they can cause tooth decay. Their food source is sugar, so if you put lots of sugar in your mouth, these bacteria will cause tooth decay.

In this post, we’ll discuss bacteria, sugar and tooth decay in more detail. By the end, you’ll know how to prevent tooth decay and also what foods are high in sugar.

What causes tooth decay?

As we mentioned, many species of bacteria live in your mouth, but only a few species actually do any harm. The main harmful species are Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus, Actinomyces and Nocardia. Don’t worry if you’ve never heard of them before – the only thing you need to know is that these bacteria can harm your teeth. They do this by feeding on sugar, which they turn into lactic acid. It’s this acid that erodes your enamel.

How can I prevent tooth decay?

One of the best things you can do to prevent tooth decay is to limit the amount of sugar you eat. Sugar is the food that feeds the bacteria in your mouth, so the less sugar you eat, the better.

However, it’s not just about the amount of sugar you eat; It’s also important to think about how often you eat sugar as well. For example, if you eat an entire packet of sweets in one go, you might feel a bit sick afterwards but it’s actually not too bad for your teeth. You’re only putting your teeth under one single sugar attack. What would be worse for your teeth is if you ate the same packet of sweets slowly over the whole day. If you did that, then you would be bathing your teeth in sugar throughout the whole day, and that long exposure to sugar would be much more likely to cause tooth decay.

So, it’s not only important to limit the amount of sugar you eat, but also how often you eat sugar as well. Try to eat sugar only at mealtimes – this way, the number of sugar attacks will be lower than if eat sugar throughout the whole day.

And of course, avoiding sugar is just one of the things you should do to prevent tooth decay. Other things you can do is brush your teeth twice a day, floss, and see a dentist for regular checkups.

What foods are high in sugar?

There are many obvious foods that are high in sugar, such as sweets, fizzy drinks, biscuits, cakes and chocolates. Many foods are high in sugar but aren’t so obvious. For example, did you know that ready meals are usually high in sugar? Another hidden source of sugar is alcohol – a bottle of beer can sometimes contain more than 20 g of sugar.

To learn how much sugar a food or drink contains, read the packet, as the nutritional information will tell you exactly how much sugar there is inside.

You can also visit https://nutritiondata.self.com/, which is a website that will tell you roughly how much sugar there is in most types of foods.

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How to look after your teeth after you turn 40

How to look after your teeth after you turn 40

Turning 40 is a milestone that many people consider to be the start of middle-age. As well as being a time for transition and reflection, it’s also time to think about your dental health. That’s because if you’d like to reach old age with all your teeth still intact, then it pays dividends to start thinking about your teeth now. So, in this post, we’ll get you off to a good start by going over the main oral health problems suffered by people over the age of 40.

Gum disease

Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, can occur at any age, but it’s more likely to occur as you get older. In fact, after you turn 35, you’re more likely to lose a tooth to gum disease than to tooth decay.

The good news is that gum disease is preventable. The main thing you can do to prevent it is to brush your teeth and gums for two minutes, twice a day. Make sure to pay special attention to your gums, brushing them thoroughly. Flossing once a day can also help prevent gum disease.

Note that if have bright red gums or if your gums bleed regularly, then you may already have gum disease. Make sure to see a dental if this is the case.

Oral cancer

Oral cancer, which includes cancers of the mouth, tongue and throat, is more frequent in people over the age of 40.

Oral cancer is usually first spotted by a dentist at a routine dental check-up, so make sure you keep going to the dentist regularly. Also, do watch your alcohol and tobacco use, as they both increase your risk of getting oral cancer.

Breakdown of dental fillings

Did you know that fillings don’t last forever? It’s true: over time, they break down and no longer work as well as they should. In fact, fillings are only expected to last around 10 years, although some can last longer. Your dentist will look up for worn out filings during your regular check-ups.

Menopause

Changes in female hormone levels during menopause can lead to several unwanted oral symptoms, including gum inflammation, mouth pain, dry mouth and increased susceptibility to plaque. That’s why brushing and flossing are more important than ever during menopause to prevent tooth decay and fight gum disease.

Dry mouth

As we get older, our mouths produce less saliva. This is bad for our teeth because it increases our risk of dental decay. If you suffer from dry mouth, then one solution is to keep your mouth moist by drinking plenty of water throughout the day. Seeing a doctor can also help to rule out underlying causes.

Sensitive teeth

Aging means that our tooth enamel gradually wears away. One sign that your enamel is wearing away is tooth sensitivity. Your teeth might feel more painful when you brush them for example, or when you eat hot and cold foods. Sensitive teeth aren’t only a sign of aging, however. It can happen for several reasons, such as tooth decay, worn out fillings, and gum disease. Tell your dentist if you’re suffering from sensitive teeth because you will want to rule out the possible causes.

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Six reasons why your wisdom teeth might need to be removed

Six reasons why your wisdom teeth might need to be removed

Did you know around 35% of people are born without wisdom teeth? It’s true! These lucky people don’t have these troublesome teeth to deal with.

The other 65% of us, however, do have wisdom teeth. Furthermore, many of us end up having them taken out.

But what are the reasons why a dentist would need to remove your wisdom teeth? In this post, we’ll go over some of the reasons why you might need your wisdom teeth removed.

1) Cavities

No one wants cavities, but unfortunately, your wisdom teeth are at a higher risk of cavities than your other teeth because they’re harder to clean. Being at the very back of your mouth, your wisdom teeth are certainly easy to neglect. They’re also more difficult to see than your other teeth, which means you can’t visually inspect them as easily.

Partially impacted wisdom teeth (which is where the wisdom tooth has only partially emerged from the gum) are at an even higher risk of cavities because bacteria can easily get trapped between the tooth and the gum.

2) Pericoronitis

Partially impacted wisdom teeth can sometimes leave a flap of gum covering the tooth. This flap of gum can be problematic because food can get stuck under it and cause an infection called pericoronitis.

Pericoronitis is the most common reason for why people need their wisdom teeth taken out. Did you know that it usually happens with the lower wisdom teeth rather than upper ones?

3) Pain

Impacted wisdom teeth can push against your other teeth and cause pain. In this case, your dentist will recommend that you get the wisdom tooth removed. However, many people have impacted wisdom tooth and feel no pain at all, in which case removing your wisdom teeth might not be necessary.

4) Crowding

Crowding is another complication of impacted wisdom teeth. Crowding happens when your wisdom teeth push against your other teeth and cause them to become crooked. If you want to make your teeth straight again, then braces and removal of the wisdom tooth are the order of the day here.

5) Cysts

Wisdom teeth can also cause cysts, which are fluid-filled growths that can permanently damage your teeth, bone and nerves. If a dentist sees a cyst on an x-ray, then he or she will almost certainly recommend that you get the cyst and wisdom tooth removed as soon as possible.

6) Tumours

Finally, the most serious type of complication arising from wisdom teeth are tumours. Don’t worry though because they’re very rare. Furthermore, most tumours are non-cancerous (benign).

For the very small number of people who do have a tumour, removal of tissue and bone may be required, along with the tumour and wisdom tooth.

What to do if you have problems with your wisdom teeth

There’s not much you can do to prevent problems with your wisdom teeth apart from brushing and flossing twice a day. You should also visit to a dentist for regular check-ups as this can help spot problems before they get worse. To make a check-up appointment with us, simply call our friendly receptionists!

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What are the benefits of implants?

What are the benefits of implants?

If you’re missing one or more teeth, then there are several treatments to consider: partial dentures, full dentures, bridges, crowns and implants. These are all options to replace missing teeth.

Implants are typically the most expensive option, but they’re usually the most effective too. In this post, we’ll discuss the benefits of implants that you can make an informed decision about the best treatment for your smile.

Implants are a permanent solution

Implants are permanent. This means that once you have them, you should never need to take them out or get them replaced. In contrast, dentures, crowns and bridges all require replacement every few years as well as regular maintenance. This means that in the long run, implants can work out cheaper than other methods of tooth replacement.

Implants are comfortable

Another benefit of implants is that they’re very comfortable to wear. They feel just like natural teeth and you’ll soon forget that they’re artificial.

In comparison, dentures can sometimes be uncomfortable to wear. Sometimes dentures don’t fit properly or they take a long time to get used to. Implants don’t have this problem.

Implants are stable

Implants are also very stable. They attach securely to the jawbone which means they won’t ever fall out. You also won’t have to use adhesive to keep them in place.

Implants are easy to maintain

Implants are very easy to look after as there’s nothing special involved in maintaining them. All you have to do to take care of them as you would your own teeth. This will involve brushing them twice a day with toothpaste, flossing once a day and seeing a dentist regularly. That’s not too difficult – it’s what you should be doing anyway!

Furthermore, unlike dentures, you don’t need to take implants out to clean them. It’s unlikely that your dentist will ever have to repair them.

Implants are good for your bone health

One of the greatest advantages of implants is that they protect your bone health. They integrate directly into your jawbone, which helps prevent bone deterioration. This helps maintains a healthy facial structure and can keep you looking younger for longer. Indeed, we often see implants can take years off our patients’ smiles.

Other methods of replacing a missing tooth don’t have this advantage. Crowns, bridges and dentures don’t stimulate your jaw bone, and if you’ve already lose most or all of your teeth, then your jaw bone could start to dissolve away. This can add years to your face, due to wrinkles and a general deterioration of the facial structure.

You can get quick results

Implants are a typically faster procedure than a bridge or dentures – some patients can even receive implants in as little as one sitting. We’ll restore your smile in no time at all!

Conclusion

So, are implants the best option? While it’s true that dental implants are usually the most costly choice, the benefits they offer over other treatments can be priceless. To find out if implants are the right decision for you, book an appointment with one of our dentists. We’ll be happy to discuss your options with you.

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Microabrasion with Dr Emma Franks

microabrasian-emma-franks

This young patient came to us because she was becoming very conscious of staining on her front teeth. She had been told previously she would have to wait until age 18 to have them whitened.

We decided to carry out a conservative treatment known as microabrasion. This involves polishing the teeth with a mild abrasive polish, to remove the staining in the enamel.

The treatment is carried out without anaesthetic, and completed in approximately 10 minutes. It is very safe and conservative.

The patient was very happy with her new appearance and has gained the confidence to smile again.

This treatment is suitable for various types of staining- depending on the cause and severity of the stains. It can be used in conjunction with whitening before or after the microabrasion, for more complicated aesthetic cases.

If you are interested in this treatment please contact the practice.

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